HiRISE

High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment

HiRISE

HiRISE image, taken on Jan 18, 2012, displays rock and/or soil erosion between mesas on Mars. Image: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.

Overview

Ball Aerospace’s High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera is flying aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and is returning unprecedented images of the Martian surface.

HiRISE is the largest telescopic instrument ever sent beyond Earth’s orbit. It is able to image the Martian surface up to five times the resolution provided by the Mars Global Surveyor, identifying images as small as a coffee table.  HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona.

The high-resolution images provided by HiRISE are yielding unmatched views of layered materials, gullies, channels, and other science targets, in addition to characterizing possible future landing sites for robotic and manned missions.

Victoria Crater

High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera

Our Role

Ball Aerospace built the HiRISE camera that provides images of both predicted and unknown features on Mars’ surface at a higher resolution and contrast than ever before.

HiRISE relies on Ball Aerospace’s advanced imaging technologies, such as those employed in QuickBird, Deep Impact, and the Hubble Space Telescope.

 

Programs

CALIPSO

CloudSat

EPOXI/Deep Impact

GEMS

GEO-TASO

GDPAA

GMI

Guardian

Green Propellant Infusion Mission

HiRISE

Hubble Space Telescope

James Webb Space Telescope

JPSS

F-35/Lightning II

K2/Kepler

Landsat Data Continuity Mission

Mast-Mounted Sight

Mk 20 Camera

MOIRE

New Horizons/Ralph

OMPS

Orion

QuickBird

QuikSCAT

SAM

SBSS

SBUV/2

Seasparrow

Sentinel

Spitzer

STORRM

STP-SIV

Suomi NPP

TEMPO

WISE

WorldView spacecraft series

WorldView-1

WorldView-2

WorldView-3