QuickBird

QuickBird

The Ball Aerospace Global Imaging System 2000 provides one-meter class panchromatic and four-meter class multispectral imagery over a broad area.

 

Overview

Launched in October 2001, Ball Aerospace’s QuickBird remote imaging satellite retired from the DigitalGlobe Remote Sensing Constellation in January 2015. The satellite, which far exceeded its five-year design life, de-orbited successfully after making 70,000 trips around the Earth during its more than 13 years on orbit.

Quickbird was designed and built by Ball Aerospace for DigitalGlobe and provided the highest resolution Earth imagery that was commercially available at the time it launched.

QuickBird was Ball’s first venture into the commercial spacecraft market, and became the basis for the development and maturation of the company’s highly successful Commercial Space Operations business unit. QuickBird demonstrates the longevity and reliability of spacecraft and instruments built by Ball for the fixed-price market.

Our Role

Ball Aerospace designed, fabricated, integrated and tested the total space segment consisting of a spacecraft bus and 61-centimeter imaging instrument aboard the pioneering satellite. QuickBird was able to identify images as small as 2 feet.

Built on a firm, fixed-price contract, QuickBird used the Ball Commercial Platform 2000 to capture 61 centimeter (black and white) and 2.4 meter multispectral (color) digital images of Earth’s surface. QuickBird circled the globe 450 km (about 280 miles) above Earth while the Ball high-resolution camera gathered images of the Earth’s surface during daylight hours. The world-class images have contributed significantly to mapping, agricultural and urban planning, weather research and military surveillance.

Ball and DigitalGlobe have continued to team on three additional remote sensing satellites with advanced capabilities: WorldView-1, WorldView-2 and WorldView-3.

 

BHRC

Ball Aerospace's High-resolution Camera 60 is an Earth-imaging system that is capable of imaging a strip of the Earth's surface between 14 and 34 kilometers wide.

 

 

Quickbird image of Bangkok

Royal Grand Palace Detail
This full-resolution 61-centimeter panchromatic image of a portion of the Royal Grand Palace shows the level of detail attainable from QuickBird imagery. Key identifiable features are the elaborate roof structures, individual shrubs in the landscaping to the right of the palace, and individual people on the road above and to the left of the palace. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

 

Quickbird image of Washington Monument

Washington Monument
This natural color 61-centimeter resolution pan sharpened image of the Washington Monument is a full resolution image that shows the National Mall area. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

Programs

CALIPSO

CloudSat

DSCOVR

EPOXI/Deep Impact

GEMS

GEO-TASO

GDPAA

GMI

Guardian

Green Propellant Infusion Mission

HiRISE

Hubble Space Telescope

James Webb Space Telescope

JPSS

F-35/Lightning II

K2/Kepler

Landsat 8

Mast-Mounted Sight

Mk 20 Camera

New Horizons/Ralph

OMPS

Orion

QuickBird

QuikSCAT

Replicated Diffractive Optics/MOIRE

SAGE

SAM

SBSS

SBUV/2

Seasparrow

Sentinel

Spitzer

STORRM

STP-SIV

Suomi NPP

TEMPO

WISE

WorldView spacecraft series

WorldView-1

WorldView-2

WorldView-3