SBUV/2

Solar Backscatter Utraviolet Radiometer

SBUV/2

Under contract to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Ball Aerospace has launched nine Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer-2s (SBUV/2). The first was launched in 1984, and the most recent was launched in 2009.

SBUV/2, an operational remote sensor, flies on NOAA weather satellites and monitors the density and distribution of ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere from six to 30 miles. SBUV/2 looks down at the Earth’s atmosphere and the reflected sunlight at wavelengths characteristic of ozone.

Ozone is measured as a ratio of sunlight incident on the atmosphere to amount of sunlight scattered back into space. From this information, the total ozone between the instrument and the ground can be calculated. Data also indicate the ozone’s vertical distribution.

The Ball Aerospace-built SBUV/2 helped to discover the ozone hole above Antarctica in 1987, and continues to monitor this phenomenon. Atmospheric ozone absorbs the sun’s ultraviolet rays, which are believed to cause gene mutations, skin cancer, and cataracts in humans. Ultraviolet rays may also damage crops and aquatic ecosystems.

Programs

CALIPSO

CloudSat

EPOXI/Deep Impact

GEMS

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GMI

Guardian

Green Propellant Infusion Mission

HiRISE

Hubble Space Telescope

James Webb Space Telescope

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F-35/Lightning II

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Landsat Data Continuity Mission

Mast-Mounted Sight

Mk 20 Camera

MOIRE

New Horizons/Ralph

OMPS

Orion

QuickBird

QuikSCAT

SAM

SBSS

SBUV/2

Seasparrow

Sentinel

Spitzer

STORRM

STP-SIV

Suomi NPP

TEMPO

WISE

WorldView spacecraft series

WorldView-1

WorldView-2

WorldView-3